Is Your Scent Making You Sick?

Is Your Scent Making You Sick?

Why is it that I am always the one to sit next to the person who has poured on cologne and perfume just before heading out to the movie, theatre, or restaurant? And why is it that when I am exposed to such excess scents, I feel awful?

You may be able to relate. In fact, many people have similar experiences. A number of my friends and family get migraines, allergies, and tired spells when in the vicinity of a well-meaning perfume-wearing individual who may be clueless as to their negative effect on others.

More and more, chemicals and toxins are bombarding our environment. Many of these invaders we have no control over while others we do. Our bodies are often overloaded which is why they begin speaking to us with negative reactions as a way to say, “I can’t take this much longer, I am overburdened.”

Perfumes, body sprays, colognes, and even shampoos, and body gels are filled with so-called natural fragrance. What exactly does that mean? Well, that special designer blend that you wear may contain trace amounts of natural essences, but it is most likely concocted from any number of the fragrance industry’s 3,100 stock chemical ingredients!

In fact, the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, commissioned independent laboratory tests that revealed 38 secret chemicals in 17 leading fragrances which don’t need to be listed on the bottle. As a consumer, we are left in the dark as to exactly what is in our products. While the American Cancer Society makes no conclusive claims that such chemicals cause cancer, many other studies do in fact reveal a connection.

As a wellness advocate, I speak regularly about detoxing our body and home from harmful chemicals in order to lighten the load from overexposure and to help our bodies to heal and rebalance. Aggravating reactions such as headache, sinus issues, skin rashes, allergies, and asthma for example, are signs that something is wrong. It is up to each of us to pay attention and listen to what our bodies are trying to tell us.

Our skin is our largest organ and it absorbs everything that we put onto it and rather quickly. With perfumes and colognes, we are hitting our body from two sides both topically and inhaling the potentially hazardous ingredients too.

If you’re committed to wearing your favorite scent then do yourself and others a favor and use it sparingly or better yet, look for a new favorite made from only pure essential oils. The goal with any scent is to offer a personal expression of our personality to the world but applied just light enough so that somebody next to us in an intimate setting can smell it. We shouldn’t wear it so that we are immediately noticed when walking into a room as if leaving the perfume counter at Bloomingdales.

It is time for us to not only think about ourselves but also others. Be considerate when going out and especially if you’ll be in an enclosed setting with others sitting near you. Just because you aren’t bothered by your scent, doesn’t mean that others wont be.

For more information go to the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) website http://www.ewg.org and research a list of what chemicals to avoid in order to improve your health.

 

Jay Bradley is a Youthful Aging, Wellness & Lifestyle Expert Living in Los Angeles. http://www.JayBradleyLifestyle.com

He is the Best-Selling Author of LIVE LOOK FEEL, The 12-Week Guide to Live Longer, Look Younger & Feel Better!

Botox – Not Just for Wrinkles!

Botox – Not Just for Wrinkles!

Los Angeles is most likely the Botox capital of the world. Of course that is just my assumption based on the fact that there are so many leading men and women here making an effort to slow the clock for their film and television careers.

Whether you’re a celebrity or a not, millions of people around the world are benefiting from the cosmetic effects of Botox.

As a refresher, Botox is a drug made from a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It’s the same toxin that causes a life-threatening type of food poisoning called botulism. Doctors have been using a low dose of it for many years to treat fine lines and wrinkles.

But beyond the quest for youth, Botox has also been researched to have other beneficial uses. Here is a short list of how it is now being used in the world of medicine:

Excessive Sweating – Sweat no more! Botox is a temporary treatment option for those who suffer from hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating. Botox is injected into the sweat glands just under the skin to temporarily block the chemical signals from the nerves that stimulate the sweat glands. Botox prevents unnecessary sweating for an average period of six to seven months.

Migraines – This has proven a Godsend for those who suffer from migraines. The FDA has approved the use of Botox in a variety of areas in the body including the temples, neck, forehead, and shoulders to prevent or significantly lower the onset of chronic migraines.

Eyelid Spasms – One of the first medical uses for Botox was for abnormal eye spasms. Botox is still used for severe and uncontrollable eye and muscle spasms.

Chronic Neck and Cervical Muscle Pain – For those living with chronic neck and back pain, Botox may help. In 2012, a study showed that Botox injections significantly improved pain levels for sufferers of chronic neck pain that happens with cervical dystonia.

Overactive Bladder – Botox is often used to treat several incontinence and overactive bladder symptoms in adults. It may help for those with a strong urge to urinate, those who have constant leaking and for those who urinate too frequently.

Muscle Stiffness – Botox is used to treat increased muscle stiffness in the elbow, wrist, arm, and finger muscles in adults with upper limb spasticity.

Jaw Reduction – Botox can be used to reduce the jaw size by injecting Botox into the masseter muscles. This is mainly done for cosmetic reasons for women who want to appear more round and feminine resulting in a less square appearance.

TMJ Disorder – Relatively new research has shown Botox to be effective in treating a variety of jaw disorders including severe tension, TMJ Disorder, and lockjaw. When injected into the jaw, Botox relaxes the facial muscles while reducing occurrences and symptoms.

Depression – A fascinating study in Germany linked the use of Botox on frown lines with a reduction of depression symptoms and an increase in overall wellbeing.  They stated that facial movements often signal our emotions and the use of Botox can interrupt this cycle, which was shown to alleviate depressive thoughts and feelings.

 

Jay Bradley is a Youthful Aging, Wellness & Lifestyle Expert Living in Los Angeles.

http://www.JayBradleyLifestyle.com

He is the Best-Selling Author of LIVE LOOK FEEL, The 12-Week Guide to Live Longer, Look Younger & Feel Better!